Do we know why we are stuck in a diabetes epidemic?

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| November 20, 2012 | 4 Replies
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How about low fat Dietary Guidelines that have been sweet on sugar for 35 years!

Even though elevated blood sugar is the common denominator of obesity, diabetes, and diet-related heart disease, the words  “blood sugar” do not appear in the federal government’s official 2010 Dietary Guidelines.

Professor Joanne Slavin, University of Minnesota, Carbohydrate Chairperson, 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, Carbohydrate Chairperson

During Day 2 of the first meeting of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC), Joanne Slavin, PhD, RD, Professor, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, chair of the Carbohydrate Committee, took the stand.

It was Halloween Day, October 30, 2008.

Professor Slavin: 

“High fructose corn sweeteners do not appear to contribute to overweight and obesity any differently than other energy sources… calories are calories and high fructose corn sweeteners are no different than other calories, calorie per calorie…”

Even before any public or scientific testimony, Dr. Slavin blocked any chance that blood-sugar-raising-refined carbohydrates  would be even mentioned in the “science-based” guidelines. A calorie of avocado, she was testifying, was no different than a calorie of corn syrup.

Professor Slavin:  “Grading carbohydrates good or bad would be too controversial.”

A General Mills VP is a member of the International Food Information Council Foundation in Washington, DC, a group that by its own admission is heavily involved in nominating DGAC members.

Controversial to whom?  To the general public hoping to dodge diabetes – or to Minnesota-based food companies like cereal-maker General Mills, a generous supporter financially of Slavin’s employer, the Nutrition School at the University of Minnesota.

Professor Slavin:  “Recommendation for added sugars is that they not be more than 25 percent of total calories …”

In the midst of obesity and diabetes epidemics, Professor Slavin is saying it’s perfectly okay for Americans to consume up to 25 percent of their calories as sugar!

Carbohydrates raise blood sugar; fats do not. Yet the 2010 Dietary guidelines say limit and restrict natural dietary fat and nutrient dense  foods like eggs, but its okay to consume up to 25 percent of calories as sugar.

Know we know why we are stuck in a diabetes epidemic!

Is it fair to ask, how did Slavin get selected to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC). Did she appoint herself Carbohydrate Chair? Was her Halloween Day testimony a trick on the 25 percent of the population that is diabetic or pre-diabetic and a big treat for Big Sugar?

You can read the transcripts yourself at:

  www.cnpp.usda.gov/DGAs2010-Meeting1.htm

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Category: Diabetes/Heart Disease

Comments (4)

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  1. Who are you asking these questions of? This is a federal program mandated by congress. Have you asked these questions to your elected officials? What did they say?

  2. Alan Watson says:

    I am asking the general public to consider how the 2010 Dietary Guidelines do not contain any references to blood-sugar-raising foods and no discussion about the hormonal response to excess sugar in the blood.

  3. anon says:

    I think that congress, pharmaceutical companies, and some doctors collude against the health of many Ameircans and others in the world where US grain also is sold in quantity. Follow the money; if people can be convinced that a pill will cure them, by the time they realize it won’t their symptoms are much worse (i.e. have turned into “disease”) that cannot be cured but inevitably will require highly expensive new drugs, procedures, hospitalization, and surgeries. This is what many who believe the nonsense about carbohydrates are doomed to endure. All for the sake of enrichment of individuals who control “scientific research”, “peer review”, and “governent nutritional information”. At best this seems like attempted murder.

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